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Question on book binding 
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Ulthal

Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 7:00 am
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Post Question on book binding
Hi folks,

I'm thinking about making yet another purchase from TLG, but I've got a question: I'm seeing that alot of the books I want are "saddle stitched". What exactly is this? Is it the round, plastic comb-thingee I'm thinking of or is it something else? A picture would be FANTASTIC. Thanks!!

Ink
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 2:56 pm
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Red Cap

Joined: Thu May 11, 2006 7:00 am
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This is an example ofa saddle-stitched book. You've no doubt seen 'em before!


Thu Jul 13, 2006 3:00 pm
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Ulthal

Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 7:00 am
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Weird...I always thought that what's shown in that picture is called "perfect bound". I'm so confused....lol

*runs to google*

Ink
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 3:02 pm
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Maukling
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Post Re: Question on book binding
Quote:
Inkpot wrote:
Hi folks,

I'm thinking about making yet another purchase from TLG, but I've got a question: I'm seeing that alot of the books I want are "saddle stitched". What exactly is this? Is it the round, plastic comb-thingee I'm thinking of or is it something else? A picture would be FANTASTIC. Thanks!!

Ink



Saddle stitched is simply, folded and stapled. The term 'saddle stitch' comes from the early method of stapling. Towit, one takes the folded document, puts it on this 'saddle' like device and pushes the staple button.

These days, the latest printing machines have a staple device installed in them, but the term stuck.

Perfect bound is simply the term for any soft back book.
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 3:10 pm
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Ulthal

Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 7:00 am
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You guys just rock. Thanks for the clarification!!

Ink
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 3:15 pm
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Greater Lore Drake
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Sorry to contradict you a little bit Pete, but perfect binding doesn't refer to any softback book. By that definition, saddle stitched books would be perfect bound. Must be the perfectionist in me, but I actually surprised the Acaeum guys a year ago by revealing that the early edition AD&D hardcovers were not all Smythe sewn as they thought, but side sewn.

A bookbinding glossary can be found here. Some of the most common types of binding for our purposes are defined below.
comb binding

A form of MECHANICAL BINDING consisting of a plastic strip on the spine from which curved prongs extend. They are inserted into holes punched into the leaves to be held. The name derives from the resulting "comb" appearance of the binding. This type of mechanical binding provides a more-or-less solid spine on which the title of the publication may be printed. Its disadvantages, however. are many: leaves may be removed quite easily by unauthorized persons, and groups of leaves often slip from the grasp of the flexible prongs. In addition, leaves tend to tear from the binding because the large, usually rectangular, slots leave relatively little paper along the line of the punched holes.
adhesive binding

A method of securing loose leaves into a solid text block by means of an adhesive rather than by means of sewing, stitching, etc. In general, there are four techniques of adhesive binding in use today: 1) PADDING (2) ; 2) manual adhesive binding, which is still practiced by hand binders and some library binders; 3) semiautomatic adhesive binding, which is the usual method in library binderies and some paperback edition binderies; and 4) fully automatic adhesive binding, which is the usual method in edition binding.

Two basic methods are used to secure the leaves in adhesive binding: 1) application of the adhesive to the edges of the collected and clamped leaves, without fanning, in which case there is little if any penetration of adhesive between the sheets; and 2) fanning the clamped leaves, either in one direction or both (in the latter case 180), so that the adhesive is applied a slight distance onto the leaves, thus forming a more secure bond. A HOT-MELT ADHESIVE is usually employed in the first method, whereas a cold RESINOUS ADHESIVE , e.g., POLYVINYL ACETATE , is typical in the latter method. It is not unusual, however, to use a combination of the two adhesives. The resinous adhesives are generally used alone, but hot melts may be used in either a one-shot operation (hot melt alone), or in a two-shot application (a primer of polyvinyl adhesive, followed by the hot melt, in which case the leaves are usually fanned upon application of the cold adhesive).

Adhesive binding generally results in a book that opens easily and lies flat. It is also a relatively economical form of binding, especially when long runs of the same edition are being bound. The method lends itself well to the mass production of low-priced paperbacks, catalogs, telephone directories, and the like. It is also finding greater use in library binding for books that are not in sections and have relatively narrow margins, as well as for rebinding books printed on paper that is deteriorating. Adhesive binding, however, is not a satisfactory method of binding coated and similar papers.

Adhesive binding, in one form or another, is not a new concept; in fact, it dates back to the 1830s when William Hancock invented the so-called CAOUTCHOUC BINDING in England. Overall, however, even though the method is very practical for books that are to receive heavy use over a relatively short period, (e.g., telephone directories), adhesive binding is generally considered to be inferior to the sewn binding and its permanence has yet to be demonstrated. Also called "perfect binding." or "unsewn binding. See also: ADHESIVE BINDING MACHINE ;ONE-SHOT METHOD ;TWO-SHOT METHOD
saddle stitching

The process of securing the leaves of a section, e.g., a periodical issue or pamphlet, through the center fold by means of wire staples. The term "saddle" derives from the SADDLE of the machine. The machine cuts the wire, forms the staple, drives it through the paper and clinches it from the other side. The section is stitched in two or more places depending on the height of the publication. The number of leaves that can be satisfactorily stitched in this manner depends to a great degree on the thickness of the paper. Saddle stitching, which is fast and, therefore, more economical than SADDLE SEWING , enjoys the same advantage of that method, namely, full openability to the gutter of the binding margin. The staples used in saddle stitching are usually formed from round wire and are generally made of copper, galvanized iron, or aluminized iron. Also called "wire stabbing." See also: SIDE STITCHING


side sewing

A method of securing the leaves of sections of a book with thread near the binding edge, from front to back through the entire thickness of the text block. When a book is said to be side sewn, it is implied that the text block does not consist of individual sections which are first fastened by themselves and then to each other, but that all of the leaves are sewn through at one time. Side sewing is an extremely strong form of sewing; however, it affords very little openability, unless the inner margin is very extensive, the paper is very flexible, e.g.,JAPANESE SEWING , or the book is very large, e.g., an unabridged dictionary. Also called stab sewing. Cf: SIDE STITCHING .
Smyth-Cleat sewing

A method of machine sewing or lacing adapted from an earlier European method by the Smyth Manufacturing Co. in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It combines thread and adhesive to secure the leaves of a book. In a separate machine, the back of the sections are planed off leaving the spine as smooth as possible. This is a very critical part of the operation, because if the cut spine is not smooth and even, subsequent operations are affected detrimentally. The block of leaves is then placed spine down in the Smyth-Cleat machine and is moved into position where a circular saw cuts a number of cleats completely across the back from head to tail (the number depending on the long dimension of the book). The sawn leaves then move into the sewing position where a single hollow needle laces thread around the cleats in the manner of a fiddle or figure-eight stitch. The sewn text block is then ready rate of setting; however, if the book is to be rounded and backed, an adhesive other than a hot-melt is required. because of the DRYING MEMORY of hot-melt adhesives.

The original Chainmail book was comb bound.

The OD&D books and the Holmes' Basic Rulebook were notable examples of saddle stitching.

The majority of books, such as T1-4 Temple of Elemental Evil were done as perfect bound books, as perfect binding was the most cost effective and most durable binding.

Early prints of the AD&D 1st Edition PHB, MM, and DMG were all side sewn and glued to the cover. Subsequent 1st Edition books were perfect bound in their hardcovers.

The C&C PHB and M&T are both Smythe Sewn.

Each of the bindings has their pluses and minuses. With comb binding the book would lay flat when opened, but the holes would get torn. Saddle stitched suffered from rusty staples. Perfect bound is a very economical form of printing, but the glues can weaken with age, and pages can fall out. Side sewn and Smythe sewn are the most durable forms of binding, but they tend not to lay flat and the text block, while unlikely with todays glues, could detach from the cover.
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 9:43 pm
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Maukling
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Quote:
Traveller wrote:
Sorry to contradict you a little bit Pete, but perfect binding doesn't refer to any softback book. By that definition, saddle stitched books would be perfect bound. Must be the perfectionist in me, but I actually surprised the Acaeum guys a year ago by revealing that the early edition AD&D hardcovers were not all Smythe sewn as they thought, but side sewn.



Must be the lazy git in me. I simply presume that people know I'm excluding fold and staple when I talk about perfect binding.
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 9:49 pm
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Greater Lore Drake
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Ahhh nooo. You're not lazy at all. I'm just too precise for my own good.
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:02 pm
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Mogrl

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So, how does one go about making a fall-apart book?


Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:10 pm
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Maukling
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Quote:
serleran wrote:
So, how does one go about making a fall-apart book?



Thats called a not-so-perfect binding.
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Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:11 pm
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